The Types of SEO Tools

seo tools for photographers

One of the biggest tips we give to photographers just starting out online, after building a website and starting to do some basic search engine optimization, is to frequently check how their SEO is doing. It’s only by knowing what’s working and what isn’t that you can continually improve your SEO.

Also, it’s important to remember that even if you’re at the top of Google now, you might not be forever. That means that it’s important to always stay on top of your SEO status and make sure everything you do online contributes to your SEO.

We did a post on the basics of checking your SEO a few days ago, but I thought it would be good for our readers to see some specific examples of the types of SEO tools available. Like in the last article, we drew a lot on Web Gnomes’ list of free SEO tools, as well as on their article on SEO analysis tools (which this SEO thinks is one of the most important types).

What are SEO analysis tools?

SEO analysis tools are diagnostics that seek to create a report that gives you a big-picture view of how your site is doing SEO-wise. They’re a great tool for everyone doing SEO – they’re good for beginners because they’re simple and broadly focused, and good for more advanced SEOs because they can point out problems you didn’t know you had and let you know when to use more specific tools.

Raven Tools’ Site Auditor is one of the best SEO diagnostics out there, but it’s also expensive. I wouldn’t recommend this for your photography business unless you start expanding to multiple large geographic areas – you can hire a marketing consultant company like ours for not much more than you pay to use Site Auditor. That being said, Raven Tools does offer a 30-day free trial of Site Auditor, and their services are used by a lot of professional SEO marketing firms, so this tool is always worth mentioning.

A good free/freemium alternative to Site Auditor is WooRank. This diagnostic is easy to use, and most small businesspeople and photographers who aren’t ready to pay for SEO yet can get away with using the free version. The paid plans are also cheaper than those offered by Site Auditor.

What about other types of SEO tools?

Other types of SEO tools are more specific than analytic tools. They’re often utilized by advanced SEOs to start a deeper investigation into some of the problems with a given site that an analytic picks up on.

Some examples are backlink investigation tools like Open Site Explorer from Moz, server and load time diagnostics such as Google PageSpeed, mobile focused SEO tools including Google’s Mobile Friendly Test, and content analysis tools like SEO Browser.

All of these tools can help you make huge, fast changes to your SEO profile – which can set your website up for success. It certainly takes some time to learn each tool, and then learn how to use the data each tool presents, but each one can be a big part of the SEO puzzle.

How to Check How Your SEO is Doing

how to check on seo for photographers

A lot goes in to SEO – how can you find out what you’re doing right (or wrong)?

When it comes to SEO, the worst thing you can do is shoot in the dark. If you want your photography site to be highly sought after and widely available (both of which mean more customers for you!) then you have to a) know what you’re doing when it comes to SEO and b) look for evidence showing you how your SEO is doing.

One of the things that challenges photographers and other small business owners most is checking on the status of their SEO. It sounds simple. However, like many things in the SEO world, it’s not as easy as you’d think. Even looking to see how your SEO is doing can be a challenge.

The Most Basic Way to Check Your SEO

This may be obvious, and it is helpful – but it’s not enough to put you at the top and let you stay there on its own.

The most basic way to check your SEO is to Google (or search on Yahoo or Bing) some of the search terms you want your site to rank for. If you’re on the first page, that’s good – it’s even better if you’re in the top three.

Please note that you should log out of your Google accounts or use another computer to get accurate results this way. Google uses data on individual users more and more lately to give them SERPs tailored to their needs – which means your site might get a favorable bias when you search for it and not when someone else does.

This is certainly a good quick diagnostic of your SEO. However, it won’t help you much when you’re just starting out, because you still have a lot of work to do to get anywhere near the top. It also won’t help you see how a particular piece of content has performed, or if your SEO stats are rising or dipping (either of which could precipitate a change in the SERPs you want your page ranked on).

However, there are many options out there for deeper, more specific analysis – and you’ll need these to succeed.

Advanced SEO Options

I’d love to write you a comprehensive list of all the good SEO tools out there, but the fact is that would take days for you to read (and even longer for me to write). I can give you a few ideas, though.

Yoast is one of the biggest purveyors of SEO tools, many of which are free or very reasonably priced. If you use a WordPress site, their free WordPress SEO plugin is one of the best reviewed tools in the industry.

There’s also a great list of 33 free SEO tools (some of which are actually “freemium”) over at Web Gnomes. If you take a look at this list of tools, you’ll get an idea of how specific SEO tools can get. You probably don’t need every tool on the list, but downloading a few of them that focus on areas you’re highly interested in improving could make a big difference for your photography business.

SEO for Photographers in Depth: Focus Your Photography SEO

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There’s a lot of research out there on the web when it comes to SEO keyword research – almost everyone has something to say on the subject, and information from one site often contradicts information from the other.

We’ve spent a lot of time doing keyword research and analyzing the effectiveness of SEO keyword research techniques here at Photographer Marketing Academy, and we’ve done it all with photographers in mind. Although no SEO marketer can say 100% that he has the right answer all the time, we believe we’ve hit on a powerful method of using keywords to boost photographers’ SEO – and that’s focusing on the specifics.

Let’s be honest – no SEO marketing firm, no matter how great it is at what it does, can optimize a site or page for every keyword that could bring customers to the site. Doing keyword research involves figuring out which search terms will bring the most customers the most often, instead of scattering the limited resources that SEO marketers and small photography business have.

Our Approach

We’ve found that the best way to find the search terms that work the best is to aim for specifics. For example, the search term “photography” is never going to work as a keyword. Why? There are several reasons:

  1. The competition for the keyword “photography” is too high for a small business to fight for dominance of this term and come out on top. There will always be a bigger business that includes photography services – it’s best not to try to compete with international corporations when it comes to SEO.
  2. People rarely search for something as general as “photography” anymore. Rather, they search for something more specific like “wedding photography in Topeka.” Even if they do simply search for “photography,” Google’s location based search results will favor local results for their SERPs, and Google (or one of its competitors) will likely suggest more specific search terms like “wedding photography” – which users are likely to use when their more general searches don’t turn up the results they really want.

The upshot of all this is that a photography firm (or an SEO marketing team who works on behalf of a photography firm or individual photographer) must use those more specific search queries as potential keywords. For example, if you’re primarily a wedding photographer, you should have “wedding photography” optimized as much as possible throughout your site!

You should also take location into account, and use your geographic location as often as possible in conjunction with words and phrases like “photography” and “wedding photography.” This will help you win at local SEO, which is where you’re going to pull in the most clients anyway.

You’ll also want to use a wider variety of keyword phrasing when you’re focusing on specifics – for example, it’s probably equally likely that a potential client will search either “wedding photography in Topeka” or “Topeka wedding photography” – and the upshot of that is that your site should be optimized for both (if not more).

 

How to Be Sure You Hire the Right SEO Marketer for Your Photography

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The guys at the Stone Temple Blog put out this helpful infographic not too long ago, and I thought we should share it with our readers here at Photographer Marketing Academy for several important reasons.

First of all, the SEO game is hard. It takes a good, experienced company to help you market your product, whether it’s photography services or something else entirely.

Secondly, there are a lot of shady companies out there masquerading as SEO gurus. Some of them use black hat methods that are both unethical and only viable in the short term, while some of them are (even worse) straight up scams that are out to get your money and give you nothing in return.

Obviously, we want to sell you our services here at Photographer Marketing Academy – and we really do believe we’re the best around. However, even if you don’t end up going with us, and decide to either use another online photography marketing service or strike out on your own, we want to be sure you don’t get scammed or otherwise taken in by an unethical company.

Let’s look a little bit more closely at a couple of the warning signs of a bad SEO that apply to photography particularly well.

1. Don’t work with SEOs that want to automate page creation.

Automating page creation means writing programs or using other techniques to generate web pages without any human input, and that’s bad for a lot of reasons. The major one is that these pages will likely not have any quality whatsoever – meaning that even if they do give you a short term photography SEO boost, the traffic won’t keep coming. Worse, your site could get removed from Google entirely.

As a photographer, you’re an artist – and that means that a little artistry and consideration should go into every page on your site. If you choose to work with an SEO firm, make sure it’s one that will match your level of dedication to the craft.

2. “They propose massive link building” – is it a warning sign?

Well, yes and no. It really depends what’s meant by massive link building.

Backlinks are one of the most important pieces of an SEO plan – many would say the most important. So a company that proposes getting you a lot of links isn’t a bad one – it’s just that many companies offer thousands of links that are worthless.

If you’re considering working with an SEO, make sure that the links the company offers you are legitimate, and not links from dummy pages or sketchy forums.

As the infographic says, you also shouldn’t trust a company that charges per link – rather, you should look at one that charges based on the time involved in developing your SEO, or charges more or less for certain types of businesses or based on keywords you want to rank for.

If you follow these simple rules when looking at SEO marketers you may want to work with, you should stay in the clear. And if you want more detailed analysis of what makes a good SEO marketer and what makes a bad one, we’ll have another post on this subject soon.

How Often You Should Be Updating Your Photography Site & Social Media to Maximize Your Photography SEO

how to boost my photography seo today

When it comes to online content, there are two things that Google and consumers want: immediacy and relevance.

Nobody is interested in looking at your sample photographs or reading your blog posts from five years ago, and Google knows that – so it (and its competitors) prioritize websites with content from the very recent past – often from the very same day the search is made. Many SEO gurus term this the “fresh factor.” This is where the immediacy comes in.

Now for the relevance: you don’t want to fill your photography blog with non-photography-related content. You don’t want to use your personal Facebook account primarily for photography marketing on social media and you certainly shouldn’t use your business Facebook for personal activities. Readers (and search engines) want to see content that is related to the keywords and links used to optimize it for search engines – not content that is unrelated or, worse, just plain awful.

So what does all this mean for you? It’s simple:

  • You should create fresh content for all of your online properties (including your main site, your blog, your business Facebook and other social media accounts, etc.) every day or at least as often as you can.
    • For some properties, such as Twitter and Instagram accounts, it makes sense to update even more often – sometimes as many as three times a day.
  • While you’re doing this, you should also check external properties such as Google or Yelp – they may have new reviews or similar content available that need your attention. Also check your reviews and messages on Facebook at least once a day.
    • While you have to be professional, your clients and potential clients want to feel like they’re interacting with a real person – that there’s a heart beating behind the computer screen they’re using to review or contact you. You have to create fresh content and interact with them so that you become a living, breathing person to them – not just another web site.
    • Remember, when you’re responding to reviews, always be professional. Never react defensively to a bad review – instead, let the customer know you’re fixing the problem, and contact them privately to see if there’s anything you can do to make them feel better.
  • While you’re busy creating all this content, remember that in addition to being immediate, it has to be relevant. So make sure it’s good and you’re really putting your best effort into it.
  • Always remember the old SEO axiom: content is king.

If you keep all of these tips in mind and truly update your properties as often as you can, you’ll be sure to find success much more quickly than most photographers trying to sell their services online.

And if this all seems to be too much to handle in addition to doing what you do best – always remember that there are professional marketers to help you with SEO, social media, and similar activities that help you promote your photography business online.

Keyword Research: This Basic Tip Will Change Your Life

how to boost photography seo

When it comes to keyword research, a lot of business people are in the dark, and this includes photographers as much as anyone else. However, there’s an easy way to do keyword research, which is one of the most important basic building blocks of SEO.

When it comes to deciding which keywords to optimize your content for, you need to think of two things: popularity and relevance. It’s hard for small business people like photographers to do the kinds of research into search term popularity that big corporations can, but if you use your head you can figure out what’s trending and what will work for your business.

How to Be Sure Your Search Terms are Relevant

To make sure the terms your optimizing for are relevant to your business and your industry, you’ll want to be sure not to waste time optimizing for unimportant words – if you exclusively shoot still photos, for example, optimizing for terms like “video” would be a waste of time and a bit misleading. If you do shoot videos as well as stills, though, you’ll absolutely want to play that element up in your content!

But, more importantly, you should know that it’s a lot easier to target more specific terms – something as general as “photography,” for example, will likely pull up a Wikipedia entry before anything else, whereas “wedding photography in [your town]” will most likely pull up a business-heavy SERP – and you want to be sure your business is at the top of that SERP!

How to Be Sure Your Search Terms are Popular

While you probably don’t have the huge research tools available to big corporations or an expensive Google AdWords account, there are a number of free keyword research tools and great keyword research tips out there to help you find popular search terms – however, as the search gurus at Moz and other SEO journals say, you don’t always want to optimize for the most popular search terms only – rather, you should optimize for a wide array of terms – as many as you can without breaking time constraints or straining your budget.

What It All Boils Down To

There’s a lot of trial and error involved with keyword optimization, especially for smaller businesses, but keeping in mind exactly what kinds of customers you want to attract and how you want to attract them will make the process a great deal easier.

You’ll also want to focus on as specific terms as possible for the majority of your keyword optimization – and that’s the big life-changing tip. While general terms may, if you’re lucky, have a huge short-term effect because they’re so popular, the more specific search terms are what is really going to keep your business thriving for years to come.

You’ll also want to make sure that your keywords (and every other piece of your SEM plan) are optimized for local SEO – because it’s local SEO that ultimately determines whether or not a good number of small business people succeed.

Twitter Brings Big Benefits for… Photographers?

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You might be scratching your head as you read that title… but the fact is, Twitter is great for business, and that includes photography business.

Twitter isn’t quite like Instagram, where you can share your amazing images, or Facebook, where you can put a human face to your business while simultaneously sharing a comprehensive portfolio of your work – but it still has benefits for freelancers, business owners, and others in the photography industry.

Why? There are two big reasons.

1. Any social media presence can boost your standings on search engine results pages through links.

If you want a detailed explanation of this, check out out post on the benefits of social media for photographers.

If you’d rather have a quick rundown, here you go:

Every time you post on social media (any social media) and use the post to create a link back to your main site, your main site gets boosted on SERPs (Search Engine Result Pages). And every time that post is shared, forwarded, emailed, etc., you get that boost again. This is one of the quickest legal and ethical ways to boost your ranking on SERPs and beat out the competition in the photography business market!

2. The use of hashtags on Twitter can have explosive implications for your business.

Yes, hashtags are in use on Instagram, too (and to a lesser extent on Facebook and other social media).

However, the hashtag first blew up on Twitter, and Twitter does the hashtag best – meaning that hashtags may get you a bigger audience on Twitter than on any other social network.

And although Twitter doesn’t give you the same opportunity to share your photographs in the same way as on Instagram, sharing images on Twitter can often have even bigger positive implications for your photography business – as images, like text, can be more easily shared on Twitter than on Instagram, where there is no readily accessible share or retweet feature.

Twitter can also provide you with a better opportunity than any other social media outlet to directly interact with clients and potential clients, answering questions about your photography business and making public statements that help you sell your services to the public! Because of Twitter’s emphasis on direct interaction and public availability, it can be the perfect medium in which to directly engage your customer base. This engagement can pay off big time, as it’s personal interactions with you (as well as your great customer service) that will help you win out over the big time photography firms.

Even if you’re skeptical about Twitter’s potential benefits for photographers, having a Twitter account and updating it regularly can only improve your business’ prospects – as creating fresh content on or in any medium is what will keep your business in customers’ hearts and minds, and make you memorable.

So head over to Twitter today and create an account – you’ll be happy you did, and so will your many clients!